CEA/DAp seminar organization

The Astrophysics Seminars of the DAp (Département d'Astrophysique) are held at the Orme des Merisiers campus of the CEA Saclay. The schedule is posted on this website. Unless otherwise posted, the seminar takes place at 10am on alternate Tuesdays in room Galilée (Building 713C).

Current seminar organization team: V. Lebouteiller (LFEMI), M. Bugli (LMPA), M. Galametz (LFEMI).

Main official page for advertising the schedule: http://irfu.cea.fr/dap/Phocea/Vie_des_labos/Seminaires/index.php?type=3








Past seminar and next ones (current date: August 24, 2019)




SUMMER BREAK



Tuesday

September 10

10:00
Sandra Treviño Morales
(Chalmers University, Sweden)

Dynamics and fragmentation in Galactic filamentary structures


[click here for abstract]
The study of the filamentary structures in massive star-forming regions is undergoing a revolution, thanks in large part to the unprecedented high angular resolution and sensitivity that ALMA provides. We have used ALMA to conduct an observational study of two massive filaments and a hub-filament system with the main goal of building a picture of their global dynamical properties and fragmentation. We present the results for the Monoceros R2 (hereafter MonR2) molecular cloud, one of the nearest and clearest examples of a hub-filament system. The central hub hosts a cluster of massive protostars associated with an expanding HII region, where a number of filaments are converging. We have estimated total the mass accretion rate along the filaments on the order of 10^(- 3) Msun/yr. Inside the central hub, the filaments appear twisted forming a spiral-like structure, with signs of rotation and infall motions. Overall, the hub-filament system in MonR2 suggests a scenario of non- isotropic global collapse, forming a massive stellar cluster. We also present our results for G357, which is a massive filament similar to the integral shaped filament (ISF) in Orion A, but shows remarkably low star formation activity. The comparison of the fragmentation and dynamics of G357 and the ISF enables us to address the early evolution of massive filaments.

Local contact: P. Didelon, organization: V. Lebouteiller
Tuesday

September 24

10:00
Eiichiro Komatsu
(MPIA)

Finding Cosmic Inflation


[click here for abstract]
The cosmic microwave background (CMB) research told us a remarkable story: the structure we see in our Universe such as galaxies, stars, planets, and eventually ourselves originated from tiny quantum fluctuations generated in the early Universe. With the WMAP we have confirmed many of the key predictions of inflation including flatness and statistical homogeneity of our Universe, Gaussianity and adiabaticity of primordial density fluctuations, and a small but non-zero deviation from the scale-invariant spectrum of density fluctuations. Yet, the extraordinary claim requires extraordinary evidence. The last prediction of inflation that is yet to be confirmed is the existence of primordial gravitational waves whose wavelength can be as big as billions of light years. To this end we have proposed to JAXA a new satellite mission called LiteBIRD, whose primary scientific goal is to find signatures of gravitational waves in the polarisation of the CMB. In this presentation we describe the current state of affairs regarding our understanding of the early Universe, physics of polarisation of CMB, and the LiteBIRD mission.

Local contact: V. Pettorino, organization: M. Bugli






Archives:

        





2019

Tuesday

January 8

10:00
Special seminar / séminaire exceptionnel
A. Vigan
(LAM)

Direct Imaging of Exoplanets with VLT/SPHERE: Past, Present and Future


[click here for abstract]
SPHERE is the new generation exoplanet imagers installed at the Very Large Telescope. Since 2015, we have started the large-scale SHINE survey to look for giant exoplanets around a sample of 400 to 600 young, nearby stars (younger than 300 Myr, closer than 150 pc). The main goal of SHINE is to constrain for the first time the population of giant exoplanets in the 5-100 AU range, where previous direct imaging surveys and other detection methods are not sensitive. After describing the SPHERE instrument and the astrophysical context, I will present the current status of SHINE, some of its recent discoveries and the first statistical constraints drawn after 4 years from a sub-sample of 200 observed targets. Finally, I will conclude with instrumental considerations by presenting some evolutions foreseen for the instrument over the next few years.

Local contact: P.-O. Lagage, P. Tremblin, organization: M. Bugli
Tuesday

January 15

10:00
D. Allard
(APC)

Multi-messenger constraints on the origin of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays


[click here for abstract]
After a short introduction on ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) physics, I will discuss the implications of the recent Fermi-LAT data regarding the extragalactic gamma-ray background, as well as IceCube very-high energy neutrino data, for the origin of UHECRs.I will show how calculations of the diffuse flux of cosmogenic γ-rays and neutrinos, produced during the propagation of UHECRs in the extragalactic medium, can provide constraints on the possible cosmological evolutions of UHECR sources. I will present in more details the mixed-composition scenario considered in several papers by Globus et al. (which is in agreement with most UHECR data) and show that this model is compatible with both the Fermi-LAT measurements and the current IceCube limits. I will finally discuss the possibility for future experiments to detect cosmogenic neutrinos and further constrain UHECR models, including possible subdominant UHECR proton sources.

Local contact: J. Ballet, organization: V. Lebouteiller
Tuesday

January 22

10:00
Special seminar / séminaire exceptionnel
M. Giavalisco
(Department of Astronomy - UMass Astronomy)

The Evolution of Galaxies: Quenching and Structural Transformations


[click here for abstract]
Both in the present-day Universe and earlier on, approximately z~3, we have documented profound structural differences between star-forming and quiescent galaxies. The former host their star formation in rotating disks (thinner and colder today, apparently thicker and hotter at high redshifts), the latter are predominantly dynamically hot systems and have spheroidal morphology, At high redshift (z>1) and up to when quiescent systems can be reliably identified (z~3-4), dynamical information becomes more uncertain, at least in passive systems, but this dichotomy seems to persist at least morphologically. Therecent discovery that disks at high redshift (22) have mostly focused on the growth of the core stellar mass density, e.g. at r<1 kpc. These very central volumes are the sink of all the dissipative processes that take place during star formation and while they inform us, in an integral way, on the accretion history of the galaxy of both the dissipative (gas, via cold and hot accretion) and non-dissipative (stars and dark matter, via adiabatic contractions) components, they are baryon-dominated even in today disks and do not contain information on if and how the large-scale structure of galaxies evolves, dark matter included. Here I show novel evidence that the large-scale spatial distribution of stellar mass (from rest-frame light at ~4000 to 6400 Ang), i.e. of one of the two non-dissipative components, of massive galaxies at 1.5
Local contact: E. Daddi, organization: M. Galametz
Tuesday

January 29

10:00
J. Lasue
(IRAP)

Rosetta: 2 years of studying comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko


[click here for abstract]
Comets are icy bodies remnants of the earliest moments of the solar system formation and that are now studied in details by space missions. The most recent spacecraft, Rosetta, has ended its studies in September 2016 after having landed Philae for the first time on the surface of a cometary nucleus and followed 67P on its orbit for more than two Earth years. The on-board scientific instruments have demonstrated the sporadic behavior of the cometary activity as a function of its orbital properties. Cameras have unveiled an irregular surface prone to erosion and deposition of dust, with few spots of ice detected on its surface. Dust particles detectors have shown that two types of solid particles are ejected by the nucleus, one being dense and compact grains and the other being very fluffy irregular dust particles. No specific structures inside the cometary nucleus were detected by instruments sounding inside the nucleus, and the very low density of the cometary material (0.5 g.cm-3) remains difficult to explain. Gaseous particles ejected by the comet contain a high fraction of O2 and complex carbonaceous molecules like glycine, an amino acid that was first detected in situ by Rosetta. We will review the results from the whole Rosetta/Philae mission and describe in details what we have learned about these objects.

Local contact: V. Lebouteiller, organization: V. Lebouteiller
Tuesday

February 12

10:00
F. Pozzi
(Università di Bologna)

The Herschel heritage: tension between the Herschel and SCUBA-2 results?


[click here for abstract]
Cosmic dust absorbs the optical/UV photons produced by stars and SMBH and re-emits the energy at longer wavelengths in the IR regime. Infrared observations are, therefore, crucial to achieving a complete picture of the star-formation density (SFRD) , and to understanding the properties of dust across cosmic time. Thanks to the latest IR Herschel satellite (2009-2013), a comprehension of the SFRD was estimated up to z~3-4, but recent observations in the sub-mm regime (SCUBA-2) show discrerpancies with previous Herschel results. I will discuss the possible reasons for this discrepancy and show the critical role that the IR SPICA will play in the future .

Local contact: E. Daddi, organization: M. Galametz
Tuesday

February 26

Vacations / Vacances
Tuesday

March 12

10:00
M. Barthélémy
(IPAG)

Nanosats as an opportunity for space weather


[click here for abstract]
Space weather is extremely demanding in term of space data for solar, magnetospheric or ionospheric survey. Small satellites are interesting in the sense they are easier to build, cheaper and then accessible to new entities like countries without space history, SMEs and universities. Due to their lowest costs, they also can be launched in constellation for better spatial or temporal coverage. As a complex science dealing with a chain of phenomenon coming from the sun to the Earth through the magnetosphere, space weather can benefits from the multiplication of satellites. After an introduction based on the potentialities and constraints of cubesats, we will focus on two example, AMICal Sat and ATISE developed at the CSUG in Grenoble. We will then extend these example to explain why space weather is a priority application of the cubesats and give a large overview of the project in development.

Local contact: S. Brun, organization: M. Bugli
Thursday

March 21

10:00
Special seminar / séminaire exceptionnel
N. Martin, N. Flagey
(Observatoire de Strasbourg, CFHT)

Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer - the premier 10m class spectroscopic survey observatory for the next decades


[click here for abstract]
The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE, formerly Next Generation CFHT) is an advanced project to profoundly transform the current CFHT into a survey telescope with a 10-meter mirror and a dedicated, heavily multiplexed, wide-field spectrograph with a wavelength coverage of 0.4-1.8 micron and multiple spectral resolutions. MSE is borne out as the response to the astronomical community's need for a large aperture, dedicated, spectroscopic survey facility in synergy with imaging surveys (LSST, WFIRST, ...) and giant telescopes (GMT, ELT, TMT). The project is now entering preliminary design phase after successfully completing its conceptual design. We will present the current architecture of the observatory as well as the expected performance characteristics of the project and describe the science that is driving this unique facility: unveiling the properties of the faint universe, whether they relate to the origin and diversity of stellar systems, Milky Way archaeology at the earliest time, galaxy evolution across cosmos times, or illuminating the dark universe. Finally, we will conclude with an overview of the project's partnership and organization.

Local contact: S. Chabanier, organization: V. Lebouteiller
Tuesday

March 26

10:00
no seminar - AG Irfu
Tuesday

April 9

10:00
S. Aalto
(Chalmers University, Sweden)

Feeding and feedback - molecular gas in AGNs and starbursts


[click here for abstract]
Cold gas plays a central role in feeding and regulating star formation and growth of supermassive black holes (SMBH) in galaxy nuclei. Particularly powerful activity occurs when interactions of gas-rich galaxies funnel large amounts of gas and dust into nuclei of luminous and ultra luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs/ULIRGs). These dusty objects are of key importance to galaxy mass assembly over cosmic time. It is also increasingly clear that feedback from star formation and AGNs is fundamental to regulating the evolution of galaxies in the nearby Universe as well as at earlier epochs. Mechanical feedback occurs in the form of winds, turbulence, supernova bubbles and superbubbles, AGN jets and backflows. There is mounting evidence that massive amount of cold molecular gas is being expelled from galaxy nuclei and starburst regions by the feedback process. With the advent of ALMA and the NOEMA telescopes we can now study the structure, physical conditions and chemistry of the cold flows and the dusty nuclei at unprecedented sensitivity and resolution. I will focus on recent ALMA and NOEMA studies of AGN and starburst outflows from dusty galaxies. I will, for example, present recent ALMA studies with resolutions of 20 milli arcseconds (2 – 7 pc) of the launch regions of molecular outflows and jets in the nearby LIRGs NGC1377 and IC860. These outflows are different from each-other where NGC1377 shows a 150 pc scale radio-quiet molecular jet (that appears to be precessing) while the IC860 flow is exceedingly compact and dense and appears to be in a young phase. I will also discuss observational methods that reach behind the curtain of dust in the most obscured centers of U/LIRGs , allowing us to undertake new studies of heretofore hidden, rapid evolutionary phases of galaxy nuclei.

Local contact: V. Lebouteiller, M. Galametz, organization: V. Lebouteiller, M. Galametz
Tuesday

April 16

10:00
Special seminar / séminaire exceptionnel
L. Van Waerbeke
(University of British Columbia, Canada)

Axion Quark Nuggets: a candidate for baryonic, cold *and strongly interacting* dark matter


[click here for abstract]
Let's assume dark matter is a particle. The DM theories currently tested, either with direct or indirect detection, cover only a tiny range of the allowed DM parameters space. A new, viable, DM candidate, the Axion Quark Nugget (AQN), has been proposed by Zhitnitsky (2003), partly inspired by the quark nuggets (Witten 1984). In the AQN model, DM particles are very massive (gram mass) and interact very rarely, but very strongly, with the baryonic sector. They behave as cold dark matter, and yet are made of regular matter, without contradicting primordial nucleosynthesis. In this talk, I will review the basic properties of this model and some of its astrophysical successes obtained so far. I will then discuss recent work we have done on how this DM interacts with the solar corona and how the model can be more thoroughly tested in the future.

Local contact: J.-C. Cuillandre, organization: M. Bugli
Tuesday

April 23

Vacations / Vacances
Tuesday

May 7

10:00
R. Neühauser
(Universität Jena, Germany)

Relevance of historical Observations for modern Astrophysics: Solar Activity, Comets, and Galactic Supernovae


[click here for abstract]
We will review the relevance of historical observations for current astrophysical problems, in particular for the reconstruction of solar activity in the 17th century Maunder Minimium and the pre-telescopic time - as well as the study of historical supernovae in our Galaxy. Among other observations, we will discuss the strong 14-C variation around AD 775 detected in trees around the world and discuss possible causes like a nearby supernova, a Galactic gamma-ray burst, a solar super-flare, etc.

Local contact: M. Galametz, organization: M. Galametz
Tuesday

May 14

10:00

Salle Cassini
Group seminar open to everybody / séminaire de groupe ouvert à tous
S. Hernandez
(STScI)

Measuring the chemistry of stars to understand the evolution of galaxies


[click here for abstract]
Being complex systems containing vast amounts of gas, dust, and stars, galaxies allow us to study the Universe in great detail. It is inside these systems that stars form, and transform the simplest of elements, hydrogen, into heavy elements essential for life as we know it. In the last few years I have worked dissecting galaxies in an effort to obtain clues to their chemical evolution histories. Star clusters, both Globular and Young Massive Clusters (YMCs), are attractive test laboratories for several astrophysical reasons. Given that these objects can be observed and studied in detail at larger distances than individual stars, one can use them as tracers of stellar populations outside of our own Milky Way. Using spectroscopic observations of star clusters covering a broad range of ages (~2 Myr to ~12 Gyr) we probe the chemical enrichment history of the host galaxy. I will discuss recent work exploiting spectroscopic observations acquired with both the ESO Very Large Telescope and the Hubble Space Telescope where we proved that both detailed abundance and metallicity analyses are possible for star clusters at distances of several Mpc.

Local contact: V. Lebouteiller, organization: V. Lebouteiller
Tuesday

May 21

10:00
O. Porth
(University of Amsterdam)

Behind the image: first analysis of the black hole shadow in M87


[click here for abstract]
For the first time, horizon scale structure around a supermassive black hole was imaged with the EventHorizonTelescope. In this talk, I will discuss the physical interpretation of the ring-like structure emerging in the center of the galaxy M87. To compare the observations with theoretical expectations, a library of ~60000 theoretical images was obtained from 3D GRMHD simulations with different black hole spins, masses and orientations. The data is consistent with most simulations of a radiatively inefficient accretion flow and yields a black hole mass of 6.5x10^9 Msun, in excellent agreement with the stellar dynamical measurement. Further firm parameter constraints are currently thwarted by the stochastic nature of the underlying models as well as the uncertain modeling of electron physics in near collision-less regimes. More constraints are set by including multi-wavelength data and by using limits on the jet power. I will also briefly discuss implications to alternatives to GR and future prospects for physics with the EHT.

Local contact: M. Bugli, organization: M. Bugli
Tuesday

June 4

10:00
C. Baruteau
(IRAP)

Observational predictions of the presence of giant planets in the dust’s radio emission of protoplanetary discs


[click here for abstract]
The classical picture of protoplanetary discs forming smooth, continuous structures of gas and dust has been challenged by the growing number of spatially resolved observations. These observations indicate that radial discontinuities and large-scale asymmetries may be common features of the emission of protoplanetary discs, which are often interpreted as signatures of the presence of (unseen) planetary companions. During this seminar, I will report our recent and ongoing efforts to predict the dust’s radio emission in protoplanetary discs due to the presence and orbital evolution of giant planets, through gas+dust hydrodynamical simulations post-processed with dust radiative transfer calculations. I will show via these models that recent ALMA observations strongly suggest the presence of several planets in the discs around MWC 758 and HD 169142.

Local contact: S. Mathis, A. Astoul, organization: V. Lebouteiller
Monday

June 17

11:00

Salle Galilée
Special seminar / séminaire exceptionnel
M. Katsuragawa
(Takahashi Laboratory, Kavli IPMU, University of Tokyo)

Time-dependent hydrodynamic model of X-ray emitting plasma in evolved SNRs


[click here for abstract]
Recently, X-ray observations revealed that some of evolved supernova remnants (SNRs) have plasmas in which the recombination process becomes more dominant than the ionization process. In most of these SNRs having the recombining plasma (RP), association of molecular and atomic clouds are observed. This implies that the evolution of SNRs are considered to be deeply related to the environment of the ambient gas, though they are not fully understood. In order to study physical and astrophysical causes of the formation of the RP in evolved SNRs, we develop a new framework that provides both X-ray spectra and images of evolved SNRs with an age of > 104 yr. Our model calculates the time evolution of temperatures of electron and ions, which are not considered in previous plasma models, based on a one-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamics simulation. We include physical processes of shock heating, energy exchange by Coulomb interaction, radiative cooling and evolution of ionization states. The spectra are composed of bremsstrahlung and emissions by atomic transition of major elements calculated from atomic properties of AtomDB. Since effects of the surrounding environment of SNRs is important in their evolution, we investigate the relation between plasma states in SNRs and interstellar medium (ISM) density using our model by changing ISM density (1, 3, 10, and 30 cm-3). In our simulation, the RP is naturally produced in evolved SNRs (~ 104 yr) which exploded in the dense ISM. We characterize spectra by the electron temperature and ionization temperature that is an indicator of describing the ionization state. As a result of comparing these temperatures of our model with the observations, we successfully demonstrate that the time evolution of ionization and recombination are in excellent agreement with the observed values. Our model holds promising application for future X-ray missions with a high resolution spectrometer.

Local contact: O. Limousin, D Renaud, organization: M. Galametz
Tuesday

June 18

10:00
Gianpiero Mangano
(INFN Napoli)

Neutrino Physics with the PTOLEMY project


[click here for abstract]
The PTOLEMY project aims to develop a scalable design for a Cosmic Neutrino Background (CNB) detector, the first of its kind and the only one conceived that can look directly at the image of the Universe encoded in neutrino background produced in the first second after the Big Bang. The scope of the work for the next three years is to complete the conceptual design of this detector and to validate with direct measurements that the non-neutrino backgrounds are below the expected signal from the Big Bang. In this talk I discuss in details the theoretical aspects of the experiment and its physics goals. In particular, I mainly address three issues. First the sensitivity of PTOLEMY to the standard neutrino mass scale. I then consider the perspectives of the experiment to detect the CNB via neutrino capture on tritium as a function of the neutrino mass scale and the energy resolution of the apparatus. Finally, I consider an extra sterile neutrino with mass in the eV range, coupled to the active states via oscillations, which has been advocated in view of neutrino oscillation anomalies. This extra state would contribute to the tritium decay spectrum, and its properties, mass and mixing angle, could be studied by analyzing the features in the beta decay electron spectrum.

Local contact: V. Pettorino, organization: M. Bugli
Tuesday

June 25

10:00
K. Kosack
(DAp)

Searching for PeV accelerators with Very-High-Energy Gamma Rays


[click here for abstract]
From the cosmic-ray spectrum, we know that there must be objects in our galaxy that can accelerate particles to above PeV energies, but it's not clear what they are. Very-High-Energy gamma-rays (E>100 GeV to >100 TeV) provide a useful tool for searching for these accelerators, since they provide a view of non-thermal photon emission from the sites where particles are accelerated. I will present an overview of the problem, how we are using telescopes like HESS (and later CTA) to search for these "PeVatrons" and what difficulties have been encountered. Finally, I will show the latest results, including evidence for an acceleration event in the Galactic Center.

Local contact: V. Lebouteiller, organization: V. Lebouteiller
Tuesday

July 2

10:00
Stefano Camera
(Università Degli Studi di Torino)

Radio cosmology and the SKA


[click here for abstract]
In this talk, I shall review the most peculiar aspects of cosmology in the radio band, with a special focus on the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio-telescope and its pathfinders. I shall present the main radio probes that can be exploited for late-time cosmology: continuum and 21-cm line galaxy surveys, neutral hydrogen intensity mapping, and even weak lensing cosmic shear at radio frequencies. Moreover, I shall also discuss the added value of multi- wavelength synergies, presenting some show-case example of the power of radio-optical cross-correlations to test the fundaments of the concordance cosmological model, such as the nature of dark matter and dark energy, or tests of inflation and gravity.

Local contact: V. Pettorino, organization: V. Pettorino
Thursday

July 11

10:00
Special seminar / séminaire exceptionnel
Sherry Suyu
(MPA)

Cosmology with Gravitational Lens Time Delays


[click here for abstract]
Strong gravitational lenses with measured time delays between the multiple images can be used to determine the Hubble constant that sets the expansion rate of the Universe. Measuring the Hubble constant is crucial for inferring properties of dark energy, spatial curvature of the Universe and neutrino physics. I will describe techniques for measuring the Hubble constant from lensing with a realistic account of systematic uncertainties. A program initiated to measure the Hubble constant to <3.5% in precision from strong lenses is in progress, and I will present the latest results and their implications. Search is underway to find new lenses in imaging surveys. An exciting discovery of the first strongly lensed supernova offered a rare opportunity to perform a true blind test of our modeling techniques. I will show the bright prospects of gravitational lens time delays as an independent and competitive cosmological probe.

Local contact: M. Kilbinger, organization: M. Bugli


SUMMER BREAK


Tuesday

September 10

10:00
Sandra Treviño Morales
(Chalmers University, Sweden)

Dynamics and fragmentation in Galactic filamentary structures


[click here for abstract]
The study of the filamentary structures in massive star-forming regions is undergoing a revolution, thanks in large part to the unprecedented high angular resolution and sensitivity that ALMA provides. We have used ALMA to conduct an observational study of two massive filaments and a hub-filament system with the main goal of building a picture of their global dynamical properties and fragmentation. We present the results for the Monoceros R2 (hereafter MonR2) molecular cloud, one of the nearest and clearest examples of a hub-filament system. The central hub hosts a cluster of massive protostars associated with an expanding HII region, where a number of filaments are converging. We have estimated total the mass accretion rate along the filaments on the order of 10^(- 3) Msun/yr. Inside the central hub, the filaments appear twisted forming a spiral-like structure, with signs of rotation and infall motions. Overall, the hub-filament system in MonR2 suggests a scenario of non- isotropic global collapse, forming a massive stellar cluster. We also present our results for G357, which is a massive filament similar to the integral shaped filament (ISF) in Orion A, but shows remarkably low star formation activity. The comparison of the fragmentation and dynamics of G357 and the ISF enables us to address the early evolution of massive filaments.

Local contact: P. Didelon, organization: V. Lebouteiller
Tuesday

September 24

10:00
Eiichiro Komatsu
(MPIA)

Finding Cosmic Inflation


[click here for abstract]
The cosmic microwave background (CMB) research told us a remarkable story: the structure we see in our Universe such as galaxies, stars, planets, and eventually ourselves originated from tiny quantum fluctuations generated in the early Universe. With the WMAP we have confirmed many of the key predictions of inflation including flatness and statistical homogeneity of our Universe, Gaussianity and adiabaticity of primordial density fluctuations, and a small but non-zero deviation from the scale-invariant spectrum of density fluctuations. Yet, the extraordinary claim requires extraordinary evidence. The last prediction of inflation that is yet to be confirmed is the existence of primordial gravitational waves whose wavelength can be as big as billions of light years. To this end we have proposed to JAXA a new satellite mission called LiteBIRD, whose primary scientific goal is to find signatures of gravitational waves in the polarisation of the CMB. In this presentation we describe the current state of affairs regarding our understanding of the early Universe, physics of polarisation of CMB, and the LiteBIRD mission.

Local contact: V. Pettorino, organization: M. Bugli
Thursday

September 26

10:00
Special seminar / séminaire exceptionnel
Daniela Calzetti
(UMass)

[TBA]



Local contact: E. Daddi, organization: M. Galametz
Tuesday

October 8

10:00
Jaime Pineda
(MPE Garching)

Following the gas from dense core to protostellar disk



Local contact: A. Maury, organization: M. Galametz
Tuesday

October 22

10:00
Special seminar / séminaire exceptionnel
Vacances de la Toussaint
[TBA]
Tuesday

November 5

10:00
[TBA]
Tuesday

November 19

10:00
[TBA]
Tuesday

December 3

10:00
Shu-Ichiro Inutsuka
(Nagoya University)

[TBA]



Local contact: V. Valdivia, P. André, organization: M. Galametz
Tuesday

December 17

10:00
N. Peretto
(Cardiff University)

TBA



Local contact: V. Lebouteiller, organization: V. Lebouteiller





Archives:

        







Seminars in other places:

IAP, IAP/GRECO, IHES









Laboratoire AIM (Astrophysique, Instrumentation, Modélisation)
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Français English
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Français English