Jun 08, 2020

After more than four years of research and development, design and manufacturing work, the MFT (Muon Forward Tracker), a new detector that will equip the ALICE experiment at the LHC, has seen its construction finalized and is currently under commissioning at CERN. In order to limit as far as possible the amount of material crossed by the particles, the conception of this detector has required the development of many innovative techniques and procedures, particularly in the integration of silicon sensors on flexible hybrid circuits called ladders, for which Irfu was responsible within the project. It took two years to manufacture the 500 ladders of the MFT, and a very long sequence of operations was the subject of numerous studies under the responsibility of the Irfu Antenna team at CERN. The production of these ladders has just been successfully completed and it is therefore time to make a short assessment

Mar 10, 2020

INCL (Liège intranuclear cascade) is a simulation code known for its ability to model light particle-nucleus interactions. It is used in very various fields, such as proton therapy, neutron sources, radioactive ion beams or ADS's (Accelerator Driven Systems). In order to extend its capabilities in the field of higher energy reactions, in connection with cosmic rays or with the study of hypernuclei, a team of physicists led by Irfu has recently developed a new version of the code involving strange particles. This work was at the heart of a recently defended thesis (2019) and the new possibilities offered by this code were published in early 2020 in the journal Physical Review C [1].
 

Jun 08, 2020

After more than four years of research and development, design and manufacturing work, the MFT (Muon Forward Tracker), a new detector that will equip the ALICE experiment at the LHC, has seen its construction finalized and is currently under commissioning at CERN. In order to limit as far as possible the amount of material crossed by the particles, the conception of this detector has required the development of many innovative techniques and procedures, particularly in the integration of silicon sensors on flexible hybrid circuits called ladders, for which Irfu was responsible within the project. It took two years to manufacture the 500 ladders of the MFT, and a very long sequence of operations was the subject of numerous studies under the responsibility of the Irfu Antenna team at CERN. The production of these ladders has just been successfully completed and it is therefore time to make a short assessment

Jun 08, 2020

After more than four years of research and development, design and manufacturing work, the MFT (Muon Forward Tracker), a new detector that will equip the ALICE experiment at the LHC, has seen its construction finalized and is currently under commissioning at CERN. In order to limit as far as possible the amount of material crossed by the particles, the conception of this detector has required the development of many innovative techniques and procedures, particularly in the integration of silicon sensors on flexible hybrid circuits called ladders, for which Irfu was responsible within the project. It took two years to manufacture the 500 ladders of the MFT, and a very long sequence of operations was the subject of numerous studies under the responsibility of the Irfu Antenna team at CERN. The production of these ladders has just been successfully completed and it is therefore time to make a short assessment

Jul 21, 2020
The combination of the AGATA multi-detector [right]
and the VAMOS spectrometer [left] showed that the
balance between the two contributions was more
complex than previously envisaged.                                           

The complexity of the atomic nucleus reflects a multi-component character of the « nuclear force » that holds protons and neutrons together. Proper separation and characterization of each of these components represents a challenge for both theoretical and experimental nuclear structure studies. The tin isotopes (nuclei with Z=50 protons and a number of neutrons depending on the isotope) provide ideal opportunities to study the competition between two of the nuclear force components: the so-called pairing, related to the marked tendency of protons and neutrons to form pairs in the nuclear matter, and the so-called quadrupole interaction term, describing the natural susceptibility of nuclei to adopt deformed shapes. Though of a different nature, these two interaction terms contribute to the goal of achieving an optimum organization of nucleons in the atomic nucleus that will minimize its energy.  Previous works have demonstrated that a shift of balance between these two components takes place when approaching tin-100, and this observation provided important constraints for theoretical descriptions of this so-called “doubly-magic” nucleus. Having the same numbers of protons and neutrons (Z=N=50), 100Sn is a key nucleus to validate model descriptions of exotic nuclei.

 

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