9 sujets IRFU/DPhN

Dernière mise à jour : 17-09-2019


• Astrophysics

• Nuclear Physics

• Nuclear physics

• Particle physics

 

Characterization of galactic binary systems by gravitational waves

SL-DRF-19-0358

Research field : Astrophysics
Location :

Service de Physique Nucléaire (DPhN)

Groupe Théorie Hadronique

Saclay

Contact :

Hervé Moutarde

Starting date : 01-10-2019

Contact :

Hervé Moutarde

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/Théorie Hadronique

33 1 69 08 73 88

Thesis supervisor :

Hervé Moutarde

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/Théorie Hadronique

33 1 69 08 73 88

Personal web page : http://irfu.cea.fr/Pisp/herve.moutarde/

Laboratory link : http://irfu.cea.fr/

More : http://www.cosmostat.org/people/jerome-bobin

In 2016, the announcement of the first direct detection of gravitational waves opened an era in which the universe will be probed in a new way. At the same time, the complete success of the LISA Pathfinder mission validated some of the technologies selected for the LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) project. This space observatory would consist of three satellites 2.5 million kilometres away and would allow the direct detection of gravitational waves undetectable by terrestrial interferometers. Its launch is planned by ESA for 2034.



Unlike ground-based observatories, which are sensitive to rare gravitational wave signals and subject to dominant measurement noise, a space interferometer will be continuously receiving a large number of distinct signals theoretically characterized at varying degrees of accuracy. Current estimates of source quantities and types include 60 million continuously emitting galactic binary systems, 10 to 100 annual signals from supermassive black holes, and 10 to 1000 annual signals from binary systems with very high mass ratios.



One of LISA's scientific objectives is to study the formation and evolution of galactic binary systems: white dwarfs, but also neutron stars or black holes of stellar origin. Several so-called "verification" binary systems are already identified as gravitational wave sources detectable by LISA, and this number is expected to increase significantly as a result of measurements collected by the Gaia satellite and the LSST telescope.



LISA should allow the characterization of about 25,000 galactic binary systems. The many other systems that escape individual detection will form a stochastic background, or confusing noise. In addition, as in any experiment, the actual data will be subjected to a number of noises and artifacts to be taken into account to optimize the scientific potential of the mission.



The main thread of the proposed work is a demonstration of the scientific and technical capacity to process real data in a reliable and robust way. Galactic binary systems are an excellent testing ground. This type of signal is measurable on LISA, and its form for an individual system is well known from a theoretical point of view. Nevertheless, extracting information of astrophysical interest from these signals requires solving different signal processing problems such as :

1. The separation of several individual sources, appearing as a spectrum of lines, from a stochastic background.

1. Taking into account unexpected deviations (glitches) in the analysis of data based on LISA Pathfinder's feedback.

2. Analysis based on incomplete data, due to periods of interruption in data acquisition (maintenance, subsystem instabilities, etc.).

3. The development of robust analysis methods against non-Gaussian, non-stationary or correlated noise.



It is expected that these various elements will have a significant impact on the estimation of gravitational wave signals. In this context, this thesis work will consist first of all in the study of their impact on the analysis, then in the development of new methods inspired by similar problems in image processing applied to astrophysics. These methods are based on the parsimonious modeling of signals. This allows the differences in shape or morphology between these signals and noise to be exploited to solve inverse problems. The candidate will adapt the algorithms that take advantage of this morphological diversity, implement them and analyze their contribution on realistic simulated data associated with LISA, and if possible on real data from ground interferometers.



However, this set of activities may evolve according to theoretical advances on the one hand, and the publication of new measures on the other. All these activities can lead to constraints in the design of the mission, tools or data processing methods. This subject has a dominant emphasis on signal processing and careful programming, but its multidisciplinary aspect makes it possible to explore many fields depending on scientific opportunities and the time frame of a thesis.

Synthesis of 3D descriptions of the proton

SL-DRF-19-0359

Research field : Nuclear Physics
Location :

Service de Physique Nucléaire (DPhN)

Groupe Théorie Hadronique

Saclay

Contact :

Hervé Moutarde

Starting date : 01-10-2019

Contact :

Hervé Moutarde

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/Théorie Hadronique

33 1 69 08 73 88

Thesis supervisor :

Hervé Moutarde

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/Théorie Hadronique

33 1 69 08 73 88

Personal web page : http://irfu.cea.fr/Pisp/herve.moutarde/

Laboratory link : http://irfu.cea.fr/dphn/en/Phocea/Vie_des_labos/Ast/ast_groupe.php?id_groupe=493

More : http://partons.cea.fr/

The experimental and theoretical study of the structure of the nucleon in terms of its elementary components, quarks and gluons, is a research focus at the heart of experimental programmes currently being conducted at Jefferson Lab (US) or CERN. This is one of the major justifications for the construction of a future electron-ion collider (EIC). This theme, at the confluence of special relativity and quantum mechanics, benefits from a well established theoretical framework (Quantum Chromo Dynamics, QCD), and well-defined experimental perspectives. Generalized parton distributions (GPD) and transverse momentum dependent parton distributions (TMD) offer a new perspective on the nucleon: they provide access, for the first time, to complementary three-dimensional information on the nucleon structure.



GPD and TMD are two facets of a more general object, the Wigner distribution, which is the quantum and relativistic analogue of the distribution function encountered for example in statistical physics. Together, GPDs and TMDs pave the way for a description of the phase space (positions and momenta) accessible to quarks and gluons within the nucleon. To date, GPDs and TMDs have been at the centre of active, but still largely independent research programmes due to the complexity of each of these topics.



GPDs are accessible through certain exclusive processes (all particles in the final state are detected) such as deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) or deeply virtual meson production (DVMP). TMDs are accessible through other processes, such as semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering (SIDIS) or the Drell-Yan process (DY). All these processes are the subject of intense studies, and some of them have already delivered thousands of observables for detailed analysis. Research related to GPDs and TMDs has reached experimental, theoretical and technical maturity, and is at the dawn of an era of precision phenomenology.



The PhD candidate will focus on the construction of new nucleon GPD and TMD models based on common modeling assumptions, and will proceed with the phenomenology associated with these models. It will evaluate the contribution to the description of the 3D structure of the nucleon of this first common analysis of experimental data associated with GPDs and TMDs.

1. Construction of a GPD and TMD model based on light cone wave functions using the general strategy of covariant extension. Particular attention will be paid to the description of the nucleon either in terms of a bound state of a quark and a diquark, or as a bound state of three quarks.

2. Calculations of the different observables associated with these GPDs and TMDs, at least in the DVCS and DY processes using the PARTONS and ArTeMiDe codes, and comparison with existing experimental data. Possible constraints on the wave functions used to build the GPD and TMD models.

3. Study of the 3D structure of the nucleon from the light cone wave functions thus constrained by the experimental data, in particular spin structure, energy, momentum, or longitudinal and transverse pressures.



However, this set of activities may evolve according to theoretical advances on the one hand and the publication of new measurements on the other. Overall, it should be noted that while this subject involves careful programming, most of the effort will be focused on physics. Indeed, most of the IT activity will be handled by a IT professional working within the framework of the 3DPartons virtual access infrastructure funded by the European Union from 2019 to 2023 as part of the STRONG-2020 proposal. This will allow the PhD candidate to focus his or her efforts on modeling, physical analysis and interpretation of results.

Hypernuclei and cosmic rays. Upgrading of a nuclear reaction model for a consistent treatment.

SL-DRF-19-0334

Research field : Nuclear physics
Location :

Service de Physique Nucléaire (DPhN)

Groupe Spallation

Saclay

Contact :

Jean-Christophe DAVID

Starting date : 01-10-2019

Contact :

Jean-Christophe DAVID

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/Spallation

0169087277

Thesis supervisor :

Jean-Christophe DAVID

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/Spallation

0169087277

Personal web page : http://irfu.cea.fr/dphn/Phocea/Vie_des_labos/Ast/ast_visu.php?id_ast=2105

Laboratory link : http://irfu.cea.fr/dphn/Phocea/Vie_des_labos/Ast/ast_sstheme.php?id_ast=186&id_unit=7

Nuclear reactions between a light particle and an atomic nucleus with energies around GeV occur in various domains, namely nuclear waste transmutation, hadron therapy, neutron sources, radiation shielding (accelerators and space), and the study of meteorites. At Irfu/DPhN we develop such a nuclear reaction model.



Our code, INCL (Intranuclear cascade Liège), is developed for more than twenty years with the university of Liège. It is recognized for its sound bases and is implemented in several particle transport codes (Geant4, Phits, MCNPX). Until 2011, its range of application covered projectile energies from ~100 MeV up to 2-3 GeV. It was then extended to 10-20 GeV by adding, first, multiple pion emission channels and, second, strange particles (K, Lambda, Sigma). With the latter particles the goal was not only better manage of the cosmic ray spectrum, but also to get the possibility to produce hypernuclei, which are studied in several facilities (FAIR, JPARC, JLab).



Still related to hypernucleus and cosmic ray, the topic of this thesis will an upgrade of INCL in another direction. Our model treats nucleons , pions an kaons as projectiles, and we are going to add electromagnetic probes and antiprotons. The electromagnetic probe will enable us to study hypernuclei produced at JLab (electron) and to study the impact of muons penetrating deeply the planets. Antiproton spectrum, in cosmic rays, was measured by the PAMELA experiment recently. Although much less numerous compared to protons, their interactions with interstellar bodies will be interesting to investigate. Antiprotons as projectile will be also an opportunity to compare our calculation results to the data measured at FAIR on hypernucleus production. Already available are the data with the antiproton beam from LEAR (Cern) on strange particle and hypernucleus production. Adding Ksi production could be also interesting, since this strange particle will be produced at FAIR, and also JPARC with a Kaon beam, to build S=-2 hypernuclei.



The student will include those new projectiles in INCL. The reaction mechanisms of those particles with nucleons and the nucleus should be studied before, and, after, a careful benchmark will be done to test the reliability. Sound knowledge of hadronic physics, nuclear physics and C++ is required. The new version of INCL will be eventually implemented in Geant4 and the student will be member of the Geant4 collaboration. Considering cosmic ray, he/she will collaborate with I. Leya, University of Berne, expert in interactions between cosmic rays and interstellar bodies.

Shape evolution in exotic neutron-rich nuclei

SL-DRF-19-0068

Research field : Nuclear physics
Location :

Service de Physique Nucléaire (DPhN)

Groupe Structure Noyau

Saclay

Contact :

Wolfram KORTEN

Starting date : 01-10-2019

Contact :

Wolfram KORTEN

CEA - DRF/IRFU/DPhN/LENA

+33169084272

Thesis supervisor :

Wolfram KORTEN

CEA - DRF/IRFU/DPhN/LENA

+33169084272

Personal web page : https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Wolfram_Korten

Laboratory link : http://irfu.cea.fr/Sphn/Phocea/Vie_des_labos/Ast/ast_sstheme.php?id_ast=293

More : https://www.phy.anl.gov/atlas/

One of the most fundamental properties of the atomic nucleus is its shape, which is governed by the interplay of macroscopic, liquid-drop like properties of the nuclear matter and microscopic shell effects, which reflect the underlying nuclear interaction. In some cases, configurations corresponding to different shapes may coexist at similar excitation energies, which results in the wave functions of these states mixing. Experimental observables such as quadrupole moments and the electromagnetic transition rates between states are closely related to the nuclear shape. The experimental determination of these observables, therefore, represents a stringent test for theoretical models. This thesis is integrated in our ongoing programme to study nuclear shapes by means of Coulomb excitation and more specifically such an experiment is planned on 100Zr. This method allows to extract the excitation probability for each excited state and to extract a set of electro magnetic matrix elements, and in particular the quadrupole moment which determines the shape of the nucleus. The radioactive 100Zr beam is provided by the ATLAS-CARIBU facility at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), which is currently the only facility world-wide able to deliver beams of such refractory elements. The programme advisory committee has already accepted the experiment with high priority and we expect it to be scheduled in Q4/2019. The PhD student will participate in the preparation and setting-up of the experiment. It would be advantageous if he/she started already working on the subject already during the stage M2. He/she will be responsible for the data analysis, the presentation of the scientific results (at conferences or workshops) and their publication in a scientific journal. During the thesis work the PhD student may also participate in other experiments of the research group. All experiment(s) take place in international collaborations and may require prolonged stays at foreign laboratories (e.g. 4-6 weeks at ANL, USA).

Short-range correlations in exotic nuclei

SL-DRF-19-0311

Research field : Nuclear physics
Location :

Service de Physique Nucléaire (DPhN)

Groupe Structure Noyau

Saclay

Contact :

Anna CORSI

Starting date : 01-10-2019

Contact :

Anna CORSI

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/Structure Noyau

01 69 08 7554

Thesis supervisor :

Anna CORSI

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/Structure Noyau

01 69 08 7554

Personal web page : http://irfu.cea.fr/Pisp/acorsi/

Laboratory link : http://irfu.cea.fr/Phocea/Vie_des_labos/Ast/ast_visu.php?id_ast=487

The atomic nucleus is a quantum system of interacting fermions, protons and neutrons, which can be paired at short range (1 fm, much smaller than their average distance) where the nuclear interaction is poorly known and strongly repulsive. These configurations, called short-range correlations, offer us a unique opportunity to study this regime which is particularly interesting as it corresponds to the transition from a proton/neutron to quark/gluon description of the nucleus. Experiments to characterize short-range correlations have been done on stable nuclei, but the experimental technique used up to now does not allow access to unstable nuclei, where the imbalance between protons and neutrons may affect these correlations. A new technique consisting in studying short-range correlations in exotic nuclei with a proton target is under development.

The candidate will analyze data from the first test experiment that was performed in 2018 using stable beams from the JINR accelerator in Dubna (Russia). He/she will be then strongly involved in the program proposed by the group with the radioactive beams produced by the GSI accelerator (Germany) and a liquid hydrogen target that we are currently developing thanks to a grant from the National Research Agency.

In parallel to the experimental program, he/she will perform simulations to design a new detection system based on tracking of charged particles in a magnetic field. This system will allow increased acceptance for particle identification and momentum measurement of charged particles in future experiments at GSI.

Data analysis and simulations will be performed using the C++-based ROOT and GEANT4 software, respectively, routinely employed in nuclear and subnuclear physics. The thesis will be done at CEA in close collaboration with MIT (USA) and TU Darmstadt (Germany) teams. A long stay in Darmstadt is envisaged.

Design and construction of Micromegas detectors for the sPHENIX experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and study of bottomonium production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

SL-DRF-19-0278

Research field : Particle physics
Location :

Service de Physique Nucléaire (DPhN)

Groupe ALICE

Saclay

Contact :

Hugo PEREIRA DA COSTA

Starting date : 01-10-2019

Contact :

Hugo PEREIRA DA COSTA

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/ALICE

+33 169087308

Thesis supervisor :

Hugo PEREIRA DA COSTA

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/ALICE

+33 169087308

Laboratory link : http://irfu.cea.fr/Phocea/Vie_des_labos/Ast/ast_groupe.php?id_groupe=500

The proposed PhD thesis subject consists in designing and building Micromegas detectors to equip the sPHENIX TPC. The detectors must provide a good enough spacial resolution in order to accurately measure the momentum of the produced charged particles. At the same time, it must minimize the presence of positive charges (ions) in the TPC volume. These charges could create local distortions to the electric field in the TPC and ruin its ability to properly reconstruct the particle's trajectory.



Micromegas detectors are parallel plate gas detectors that consist of two stages: (i) a drift stage that coincides with the TPC drift volume and (ii) an amplification stage delimited by the printed circuit board that collects the signal and a mesh. The electric field in the amplification stage is very large, resulting in an avalanche process when entered by an electron coming from the drift stage. The positive ions resulting from this avalanche are the ones that could cause electric field distortions in the TPC. The student's job during his/her PhD will be to study the possibility to add one or several extra meshes on top of the amplification mesh in order to capture these ions before they enter the drift volume. This will require the design and characterization of smaller size detector prototypes, the precise simulation of their properties and the test of these detectors in realistic conditions.



Regarding data analysis, the student will study bottomonium production in heavy-ion collisions, based on data collected by ALICE during LHC Run-2 (2015-2018). Possible analysis topics include: measuring bottomonium production as a function of particle multiplicity in proton-proton, proton-led and led-led collisions; measuring the bottomonium nuclear modification factor, or the bottomonium elliptic flow. Such studies are complementary to the ones that will be carried out in the future with sPHENIX.

STUDY OF PROMPT QUARKONIUM PRODUCTION IN PROTON-PROTON COLLISIONS WITH ALICE AT THE LHC

SL-DRF-19-0328

Research field : Particle physics
Location :

Service de Physique Nucléaire (DPhN)

Groupe ALICE

Saclay

Contact :

Javier CASTILLO

Andrea Ferrero

Starting date : 01-10-2019

Contact :

Javier CASTILLO

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/ALICE

+33 169087255

Thesis supervisor :

Andrea Ferrero

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN

0169087591

Laboratory link : http://irfu.cea.fr/en/Phocea/Vie_des_labos/Ast/ast_groupe.php?id_groupe=4190

More : http://alice.web.cern.ch

A few microseconds after the Big Bang, the Universe was in a quark gluon plasma (QGP) state. Such state is predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics, which is the theory of strong interactions, and should be reached at very high temperature or energy density. Such conditions are reproduced in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions at the LHC at CERN. Among the various QGP observables, the study of hadrons with heavy-flavor quarks (charm c or beauty b) and quarkonia (c-cbar or b- bbar bound states) is particularly important to understand the properties of the QGP.



Quarkonia are rare and heavy particles that are produced in the initial stages of the collision, even before the QGP is formed, and are therefore ideal probes of the plasma properties. As they traverse the hadronic matter, the binding of quark/anti-quark pairs will get screened by the color field of the many free quarks and gluons in the QGP, and the quarkonium states might be dissociated. This color screening mechanism therefore leads to the quarkonia suppression in the QGP. Since the various quarkonium states have different binding energies, each state will have a different probability of being dissociated. This results in a sequential suppression pattern of the quarkonium states. Additionally, if the initial number of produced quark/anti-quark pairs is large and if heavy quarks do thermalise in the QGP, then new quarkonia could be produced in the QGP by recombination of heavy quarks. This mechanism is known as regeneration. At the LHC, Upsilon (b-bbar) and J/psi (c-cbar) are complementary. The former is thought to be more suited to address the sequential suppression, while the latter should allow to study possible regeneration mechanisms. Quarkonia are measured via their dimuon decay channel with the muons being reconstructed in the muon spectrometer of ALICE.



Following the successful Run1+2 data taking, the ALICE apparatus will be upgraded to increase the interaction rate capabilities from 8 kHz to 50 kHz for Pb-Pb collisions. Combined with a novel self-triggered data acquisition mode, this will result in a statistics of heavy-ion collisions for Run 3 roughly 100 times larger than Run 1+2. In the quarkonium sector, this will allow us to investigate J/psi suppression and regeneration with much better statistical precision, as well as to access quarkonium states with smaller production cross-sections. The addition of a new silicon-pixel based tracker (MFT) in front of the muon spectrometer will open the possibility to separate the prompt and non-prompt (from decays of b hadrons) J/psi contributions.



We propose to study the production of prompt quarkonium states in p-p collisions, using the first data collected at higher interaction rates. In Pb-Pb collisions, the separation of prompt and non-prompt J/psi allow to differentiate among the QGP effects acting over the c quark from that over the b quark. In p-p collisions, besides providing the proper reference for Pb-Pb studies, it enables a rigorous comparison with the calculations of quarkonium production models. Through the analysis work, the student will become familiar with the grid computing tools and the simulation, reconstruction and data analysis software of the ALICE Collaboration. In particular, he/she will have the possibility to actively participate in the development of the new online/offline event reconstruction software, as well as to participate in the commissioning phase of the upgraded ALICE detector.

Studies on the nature of the neutrino with double-beta event detection in the PandaX-III experiment

SL-DRF-19-0265

Research field : Particle physics
Location :

Service de Physique Nucléaire (DPhN)

Groupe COMPASS

Saclay

Contact :

Damien NEYRET

Starting date : 01-10-2019

Contact :

Damien NEYRET

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/COMPASS

01 69 08 75 52

Thesis supervisor :

Damien NEYRET

CEA - DRF/IRFU/SPhN/COMPASS

01 69 08 75 52

More : https://arxiv.org/abs/1610.08883

The neutrino, as only particle of mater without electrical charge, could be a Majorana particle, i.e. identical to its antiparticle. In this case a new phenomenon should appear for a few radioactive atomic nuclei: the neutrinoless double beta decay. The violation of the leptonic number which follows, forbidden by the Standard Model, would be a major discovery and one of the required conditions to explain the mater-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe.



The PandaX-III experiment aims to measure the kinematics of double-beta decays of Xenon 136 in a large volume of 10 bar gaseous Xenon. This experiment could detect double-beta decays without emission of neutrinos and distinguish them from backgrounds like usual double-beta decays with neutrino emission, gammas from radioactive contamination, or cosmics. These rare processes will be detected in gaseous Xenon inside large Time Projection Chambers (TPC) with a detection of ionization electrons based on Micromegas Microbulk micro-pattern gaseous detectors. The TPC will operate under a pressure of up to 10 bar. An excellent resolution of electron energy measurement and a very good reconstruction of the event topology is required to separate neutrinoless double-beta decays from the various backgrounds. A high radiological purity of the experimental set-up is also necessary to limit the gamma background contamination. This experiment will take place in the Jinping underground laboratory (Sichuan province, China) which presents the lowest residual cosmics rate in the world. A first 150 to 200kg-Xenon TPC chamber will be installed by the beginning of 2020, and 5 modules will be installed in the following years to reach a level of 1t of Xenon.



Associated with the PandaX-III team at DPhN and DEDIP (detector, electronics and computing laboratory for physics) the student will participate to the development of high pressure Micromegas detectors with high energy resolution and their associated read-out electronics. R&D will be conducted on several types of Micromegas detectors, in order to reach 1% energy resolution at 2.5 MeV. This work will include performance measurements of the different prototypes in high pressure gaseous environment, in association with our partners at Zaragoza and Shanghai universities. In parallel the student will work on algorithms of TPC data reconstruction in view of the analysis of the data to be taken with the future experiment. The goal of these developments is to be able to measure and to determine the characteristics of double-beta decays (energy, kinematics, event topology) and to distinguish them from the gamma background events, in order to reduce their impact by a factor 100. Test set-up data as well as Monte Carlo simulations will be studied for that goal. The student will participate to the analysis of the first data of the PandaX-III experiment from mid-2020 in order to determine a first limit on the production of neutrinoless double-beta decays.

SEARCH FOR STERILE NEUTRINOS AND MEASUREMENT OF NEUTRINO COHERENT SCATTERING AT NUCLEAR REACTORS

SL-DRF-19-0035

Research field : Particle physics
Location :

Service de Physique Nucléaire (DPhN)

Groupe MNM

Saclay

Contact :

David LHUILLIER

Starting date : 01-10-2019

Contact :

David LHUILLIER

CEA - DSM/IRFU/SPhN/MNM

01 69 08 94 97

Thesis supervisor :

David LHUILLIER

CEA - DSM/IRFU/SPhN/MNM

01 69 08 94 97

Laboratory link : http://irfu.cea.fr/dphn/Phocea/Vie_des_labos/Ast/ast_technique.php?id_ast=4248

The theme of the proposed thesis is the physics of neutrinos emitted by nuclear reactors. A first part of the work will focus on the analysis of data from the STEREO experiment, which aims to test the existence of a sterile neutrino with a mass around 1 eV. The hypothesis of this particle follows work by Irfu on the prediction of reactor neutrino spectra and its comparison with existing data. STEREO is installed near the ILL research reactor in Grenoble. The analysis conducted during the thesis will accumulate all data until the end of the detector's operation in 2020 in order to achieve the final sensitivity in the search for sterile neutrino. The existence of such a particle would be a major discovery and this analysis will be part of a global experimental program supported by 6 ongoing experiments. STEREO will also provide the community with a reference spectrum exclusively from 235U fissions, allowing a complementary test of neutrino spectrum predictions.

This analysis work will be complemented by instrumental work related to the deployment of the Nu-Cleus experiment. The objective is to detect the coherent scattering of neutrinos at the Chooz nuclear power plant, using a bolometer with an extremely low detection threshold (~10 eV) to detect small nuclear recoils induced by neutrinos. Validation of this technology would open up many opportunities: tests of the Standard Model at low-energy, neutron radius of nuclei, application to reactor monitoring. The thesis work will be part of the on-site deployment effort and in particular the study of shielding for the rejection of background noise induced by cosmic-rays, the main limitation of the measurement.

This work offers a very complete training as an experimental physicist as well as a very transversal approach in several fields of physics: nuclear, particle, cosmology.

 

Retour en haut